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10 Fun Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About Independence Day

Barbecues, parades, lots of watermelon, followed up with a brilliant fireworks display. It’s the 4th of July, of course. Our country’s independence is a great reason to celebrate.

But there’s a lot more to this special day that you may not know about. Here are 10 little-known 4th of July facts you can use to stump your friends.

#1- Let me get your John Hancock

John Hancock was the only one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence to actually sign on July 4, 1776. All the others signed later.

#2- Lucky number 13

Fifty-six men from 13 colonies signed the declaration.

#3- Men of a certain age

The average of the men who put their name on this historical document was 45. The youngest was 27-year-old South Carolinian, Thomas Lynch, Jr.

Seventy-year-old Benjamin Franklin (of Pennsylvania, of course) was the oldest. Just in case you were wondering, Thomas Jefferson was 33.

#4- Ivy league

Seven signers were educated at Harvard. If you’re doing the math, that’s 1 in 8. Not too shabby.

#5- As American as it gets

The first Independence Day was celebrated on July 8, 1776, in Philadelphia. People were summoned to a public reading of the Declaration of Independence by the Liberty Bell.

#6- Patriotic coincidence

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams both died on the same day in 1826, hours apart. The date?
July 4th.

#7- Give me liberty

There are 59 places in the United States that have the name “Liberty.” Pennsylvania has the most – naturally – with 11.

#8- Hot-diggety-dog

Barbecues are big-time-stuff on the 4th of July. Approximately 150 million hot dogs and 700 million pounds of chicken are consumed each year on this day.

#9- Yankee Doodle

The song is synonymous with patriotism, but the origin isn’t quite that illustrious. “Yankee Doodle” is believed to have been a song sung by British military officers to mock the colonials. How the intent changed is anybody’s guess.

#10- Show me the money

In 1870, Congress declared July 4th an unpaid holiday for federal employees. It wasn’t until 1938 that it became a paid federal holiday.

Happy Independence Day!

Your friends and family will be impressed with your knowledge when you whip out these facts over a plate of burgers and dogs at your holiday cookout. Before you hit the road for any traveling, make sure your vehicle is up to the task.

Missing the celebration because of a breakdown is no fun.

Bring your car into Conrad’s for a check-up. Give us a call today.


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